How To

Step 1 : Find the spring angle.

Step 1 : Find the spring angle.

Before you learn how to cut crown molding, you need to first identify these spring angles. It’s a simple fact: most people are unaware that crown molding comes in three different spring angles. The spring angle is the “tilt” at which the crown molding sits on the wall. Crown molding is made this way because it shows off the details and elegance of the design more efficiently at different wall heights. For example, on a lower ceiling you would want the crown molding to tilt up towards the eye for better viewing. In the same way, crown molding set into a high ceiling looks best when it’s tilted down.

Crown molding is typically made with one of three different spring angles: 38°, 45°, or 52°. Finding the spring angle of your crown molding is simple: cut a small section of molding and hold it up the way it will sit mounted on the wall and ceiling. Now measure from the ceiling down the wall to the point where the molding touches the wall. Take that measurement and compare it with the measurement from the wall across the ceiling to the point where the molding touches the ceiling. If the wall measurement is longer, you have a spring angle of 38°. If the ceiling measurement is longer, your spring angle is 52°. If both measurements are the same, the spring angle is 45°. Take a look below to see a visual example:

Step 1 : Find the spring angle.

Great! Now you have your spring angle. The Cut-N-Crown molding tool uses three separate jigs, one for each common spring angle. Each one of these jigs is available separately or together as a set at our online store, along with our revolutionary crown molding tool.

Step 2 : Set your saw.

Step 2 : Set your saw.

Now you need to set your miter saw to half the exact angle of your corner. Whether you are cutting for an inside or outside corner, it’s safe to say that you will never find a perfectly square corner in your home. So in order to quickly find the exact degree of your corner, we recommend using an angle finder. We also have angle finders available in our online store.

Use your degree finder (as shown above) to measure the degree of your corner, divide that degree in half, and that’s the degree at which to set your saw. For example, say you have an inside corner you measure at 92°. Set your saw to half your corner degree, which would be 46°. Take a look at Diagrams below to get a better idea of what we’re talking about.

Finding Half the Angle

Finding Half the Angle

Setting the Saw to Half the Angle

Setting the Saw to Half the Angle

Step 3 : Follow the setup pictures.

You know what your spring angle is; you’ve set your saw, now the only thing left to do is cut your molding! To do this, follow the pictures on your jig to cut the appropriate side of the molding. For example, if you need to cut an inside right piece, you would place the molding like you see in below.

Step 3 : Follow the setup pictures.

Make sure that your jig is snug up against the saw guide, and make sure your molding is sitting correctly in the jig. Also, make sure that the jig never comes in contact with the saw blade. Sometimes, long pieces of molding will cause the molding to not sit correctly in the jig. To fix this, we developed special roller guides that keep the molding in the correct position. These guides attach to most standard roller guide stands, and are available through our online store. Now remember: to make the cut for the adjacent piece of crown molding, you do not need to adjust your saw. Simply refer to the diagram on the Cut-N-Crown jig, rotate your crown molding and jig accordingly, and make your second cut. See the diagram below for a visual description.

Step 3 : Follow the setup pictures.

In the traditional method of cutting crown molding, almost all of the error comes when you adjust the saw from left to right. With the Cut-N-Crown System, you have eliminated that error by relying on the two things that never change: the saw guide and the jig. Since the saw blade never moves, you always have a perfectly mirrored cut.

Congratulations! You have now mastered the art of crown molding installation. Following these simple steps will ensure an accurate cut every time.